2017 Indy 500: Starting grid, start time, live streaming info

The Indianapolis 500 is an automobile race that is held every year at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indiana. Many people know it as the “Indy 500”, and is said to be the “Greatest Spectacle in Racing” and Indianapolis 500 is also called by “The Great American Race”.

Takuma Sato wins Indy 500 2017 – as it happened
Takuma Sato clinched his first Indy 500 victory ahead of Hélio Castroneves while Fernando Alonso’s impressive race ended with engine failure

The first race was held in 1911, making it over 100 years old and the 101st running Indy 500 come to an end in the Memorial Day weekend Sunday, May 28 at 12.19pm local time. Drivers race around a two and a half mile oval circuit. They must complete 200 laps, which amounts to 500 miles. The cars used in the race are called “Indy Cars Racing” which is cars that have a single seat, and open cockpit, are of the professional level and are open wheeled.

You need to know there are many traditions in Indy 500 but one of the most important traditions is Milk-drinking at the Indy 500 every year is that of the winner drinking milk – but why? Here’s everything you need to know about the Indy 500, Indy 500 live stream, TV schedule, starting grid, start time, winners, results, watch Indy 500 live, Indianapolis 500, indycar race, 2017 Indy 500, live streaming info.

2017 Indy 500 schedule: Sunday, May 28 (green flag at 12:19 PM ET)
Start time: 12:10 PM ET
Indy 500 TV Schedule: Pre-race coverage begins at 11 AM ET on ABC
Live Stream: abc.go.com

Chevrolet and Honda are the engine manufacturers, while Firestone provides the tires. The Motor Speedway is one of the largest sporting facilities, making the Indy 500 one of the largest events in the world. The Speedway was built in 1909, and at first was used for small races, such as with motorcycles, mostly due to safety issues. In just a couple years, they began the Indy 500. Crowds were very large around the time of the event but became smaller on other days, so they chose to focus on one event; which eventually became the Indianapolis 500. The race started off as the “International 500- Mile Sweepstakes Race” until around 1916, then simply became the “Indianapolis 500” which has been shortened to “Indy 500” and sometimes, simply, “The 500”. Female drivers were not allowed until 1977 when Janet Guthrie qualified. There have only been nine qualifying females since then. Danica Patrick finished third in 2009, which is the best finish by a woman. There is a four lap, ten-mile race, for drivers to qualify for this event. On the weekend before the race, all drivers are put into a blind draw to see the qualifying order. The event is one of the largest in history, and continues to succeed, even over 100 years later. It has been a subject for many different types of media, such as films, television, and radio. When the Indy 500 is on, most of America and even the world are watching.

Sam Hornish Jr or Fernando Alonso can “absolutely” win the Indianapolis 500 this weekend, says 2003 Indy winner Gil de Ferran. “Does Fernando have a chance to win the race this week? Absolutely,” said Brazilian De Ferran to BBC.Com.

I actually do agree but I think motorsport is such a teensy contributor to our planet’s destruction in the grand scheme of things.

Our so called ‘success’ as a species and exponentially increasing population growth rate will be the No1 factor in the demise of our planet long before these racing machines gobble up the last of our natural resources. F1 has been carbon neutral since 1997, the world rally championship since 2001 and that includes the transport around the calendar which has by far the biggest environmental impact, not the ‘going round in circles.’ Meanwhile, F1 is developing more efficient engines and energy recovery systems.

F1 has been carbon neutral since 1997, the world rally championship since 2001 and that includes the transport around the calendar which has by far the biggest environmental impact, not the ‘going round in circles.’ Meanwhile, F1 is developing more efficient engines and energy recovery systems.

In short, it’s probably the cleanest world championship of any sport.